Bless Your Heart 💓

Switching from a higher-sodium diet to a lower-sodium diet can modestly reduce blood pressure in people who have normal blood pressure. When the sodium intake is lowered from 4000 to 2000 mg per day, blood pressure falls by 2 to 3 mmHg. [July 16, 2019]

Sodium is an element that is naturally found in many foods. The body requires a small amount of sodium in the diet to control blood pressure and blood volume. However, most people consume many times the amount of sodium needed. A healthy level of sodium in the diet contains fewer than 2.3 grams (2300 milligrams, or about the amount of sodium in one teaspoon) of sodium each day. People with certain medical conditions such as high blood pressure, kidney disease, and heart problems can benefit from a diet that is lower in sodium says Barbara Olendzki.

Reducing sodium intake lowers blood pressure in people with high and borderline high blood pressure. Reducing sodium can also help to prevent the collection of fluid in the lower legs or abdomen. People with chronic kidney disease and heart failure must control sodium intake to prevent volume overload, which increases blood pressure and causes swelling. (See “Patient education: Chronic kidney disease (Beyond the Basics)” and “Patient education: Heart failure (Beyond the Basics)”.)

What are the benefits of a low sodium diet? 20 Health Benefits of a Low Sodium Diet

  • Lower your blood pressure. …
  • Reduce your risk of a heart attack. …
  • Lower your LDL cholesterol. …
  • Prevent congestive heart failure. …
  • Decrease your risk of kidney damage. …
  • Prevent your chance of stroke. …
  • Lessen the chance of a brain aneurysm. …
  • Protect your vision.

What can you eat on a 2 gram sodium diet? What can I eat and drink while on a 2 gram sodium diet?

  • On a 2 gram sodium diet, you may eat enriched white, wheat, rye, and pumpernickel bread, hard rolls, and dinner rolls. …
  • Most fresh, canned, and frozen fruits and vegetables can be eaten. …
  • You may drink milk, but limit it to 16 ounces (two cups) daily.

More items… •Feb 3, 2020

What should my daily sodium intake be?

The American Heart Association recommends no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day and moving toward an ideal limit of no more than 1,500 mg per day for most adults.

Because the average American eats so much excess sodium, even cutting back by 1,000 milligrams a day can significantly improve blood pressure and heart health.

And remember, more than 70 percent of the sodium Americans eat comes from packaged, prepared and restaurant foods — not the salt shaker.

On average, Americans eat more than 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day — much more than the American Heart Association and other health organizations recommend. Most of us are likely underestimating how much sodium we eat, if we can estimate it at all. One study found that one-third of adults surveyed couldn’t estimate how much sodium they ate, and more than half thought they were eating less than 2,000 mg sodium a day.

Keeping sodium in check is part of following an overall healthy eating pattern. The American Heart Association diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, plant-based protein, lean animal protein and fish. Replace processed meats, refined carbohydrates and sweetened beverages with healthier options. Eating this way should help you limit your sodium as well as harmful fats. 

Insufficient sodium intake … If you have a medical condition or other special dietary needs or restrictions, you should follow the advice of a qualified health care professional. 

From my heart to yours!

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